John Keats

John Keats

Book - 1987
Rate this:
This book offers a revaluation of Keats' major poetry. It reveals how Keats' work is both an oblique criticism of the dominant attitudes to literature, sexuality, religion and politics in his period, and a powerful critique of the claims of the imagination. For all that he shares the optimistic humanism of progressives like Hazlitt, Leigh Hunt, and Shelley, Keats nevertheless questions the sufficiency of either Art or Beauty. Professor Barnard shows how the notorious attack on Keats as a Cockney poet was motivated by class and political bias. He analyses the problems facing Keats as a second-generation Romantic, his continuing difficulty in finding an appropriate style for 'Poesy', and his uncertain judgement of his own work. The ambiguities and stresses evident in the poetry's treatment of women and sexual love are seen to reflect divisions in Keats and his society. The maturing use of myth from Poems (1817) to The Fall of Hyperion, and the achievement of the major odes are set in relation to Keats' whole career.
Publisher: Cambridge [Cambridgeshire] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1987
ISBN: 9780521318068
0521318068
9780521266918
0521266912
Branch Call Number: PR4837 .B33 1987
Characteristics: xi, 172 p. ; 23 cm

Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

There are no comments for this title yet.

Age

Add Age Suitability

There are no ages for this title yet.

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Notices

Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.

Quotes

Add a Quote

There are no quotes for this title yet.

Explore Further

Subject Headings

  Loading...

Find it at MPL

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top