Live Work Work Work Die

Live Work Work Work Die

A Journey Into the Savage Heart of Silicon Valley

Book - 2018
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At the height of the startup boom, journalist Corey Pein set out for Silicon Valley with little more than a smartphone and his wits. His goal: to learn how such an overhyped industry could possibly sustain itself as long as it has. Determined to cut through the cliches of big tech -- the relentless optimism, the mandatory enthusiasm, and the earnest, incessant repetition of vacuous buzzwords -- Pein decided that he would need to take an approach as unorthodox as the companies he would soon be covering. To truly understand the delirious reality of the tech entrepeneurs, he knew he would have to inhabit that perspective -- he would have to become an entrepeneur himself. Thus Pein begins his journey -- skulking through gimmicky tech conferences, pitching his over-the-top business ideas to investors, and encountering a cast outrageous characters: cyborgs and con artists, Teamsters and transhumanists, jittery hackers and naive upstart programmers who work endlessly and obediently, never thinking to question their place in the system. In showing us this frantic world, Pein challenges the positive, feel-good self-image that the tech tycoons have crafted -- as nerdy and benevolent creators of wealth and opportunity -- revealing their dangerously inflated egos and teir insidious plans for the future"--
Publisher: New York : Metropolitan Books, 2018
Edition: First edition
ISBN: 9781627794855
1627794859
9781250193780
1250193788
Branch Call Number: HD9696.8.U63 C374 2018
338.4761 Pein
Characteristics: 309 pages ; 22 cm

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NFreaderNWPL Jul 27, 2018

Behind every five successful entrepreneurs stand ninety-five who didn't make it. Yet the media environment is saturated with biographies of superstar entrepreneurs and others who triumphed over adversity. Against this backdrop, Pein brings readers along for the ride as he attempts to make it in Silicon Valley start-up culture. The result is often hilarious and weird, reading like a natural follow-up to Barbara Ehrenreich's immersion in the white-collar world of networking and self-development in "Bait and Switch."

a
annod
May 17, 2018

Greed never makes for a happy life.

s
StarGladiator
May 16, 2018

Great and perfectly descriptive blurb on the back cover of the book by Thomas Frank [Listen, Liberals and What's the Matter With Kansas?].
This book is really aimed at aspiring 13 - - 20 year-olds, as a warning of the amorality of what constitutes the present tech industry.
I was a bit put off by the author's glibness, but he does make some good points along the way. Would especially recommend the first 5 pages of the book, and also pp. 131 - 136, and of greatest importance were pp. 155 -- 157.
The author sometimes confuses robber barons with nerds, otherwise he's on the right track.
[At the end of this book the author includes some very interesting comments on the demonetization which took place recently in India - - fascinating!]

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